Bromholme Priory

This page shows the progress of the Bromholme (Bromholm) Priory 3D model.

Whilst the Priory at Bacton is not a property once owned by the Pastons, it is integral to the family's story. As at July 2019 there is no general public access to the property but it can be seen from the lane which runs along what was once the boundary of the priory.

Model update:
4th July 2019
Description:


Ths is a general 3D of the central area of the Bromholm site as in 2019. The annotation points out some of the key features. Zooming in to the site will result in a less than crisp image; this is caused by the necessity to compress the file somewhat for presentation on the internet so that the download time is not excessive. For the project, the imagery is stored at a higher level so that it can be used for other purposes.

The area, as wil be seen from some of the other pictures below, does not cover the complete site up to the precinct boundaries. It concentrates on where the main church, cloisters, dormitories and other buildings once stood.

Model update:
3rd July 2019
Description:


Following on from the comments below on using the photogrammetric survey, on the right is a 3D rendition of the northern gatehouse. Two gatehouses are known; little remains of the one in the western perimeter wall but visitors today enter through this northern gatehouse. Annotations on the model help us undertand the original building.

Model update:
26th June 2019
Description:

Creating features and textures for long-gone walls has to be based on evidence, finds of stones or comparable buildings. For the west facade our 3D artist has looked at the mother Cluniac priory of Castle Acre and at the Benedictine priory of Binham Abbey. The latter has been used to suggest a design for the west facade of the Bromholm model. Binham itself comes into the Paston story later on; after the dissolution it becomes the property of Thomas Paston and he and his grandson begin to demolish it to reuse its stone.

The suggested Bromholm Priory west facade against a Binham background..

Model update:
26th June 2019
Description:

And now the model of the Priory from the available evidence begins to build.

Bromholm Priory begins to rise from the gound.

Model update:
14th June 2019
Description:

As different sources are developed, there's the opportunity to align them. In this case the details from Harrod's map have been superimposed on the photogrammetric image. The Harrod plan is very accurate in terms of scale and only needs a little tweaking to address the alignment issues.It is interesting to note that there are indications that the ruins seem more extensive than initially appear. For example, in the image below there seem to be raised areas of vegetation on or near some indicated wall lines just south of the refectory.

Photogrammetry combined with Harrod's map

Model update:
3rd July 2019
Description:


The picture below shows a still from the photogrammetric survey. We're now able to begin to upload images in 3D format. The 3D model on the right shows the 'tower' that you can see on the right hand side of the still image below; whilst today it has the appearance of a tower it is in fact the north transept of the priory. It is somewhat disfigured at its base as for the Second World War it was reinforced to become a machine gun post, but maybe the reinforcement has been responsible for it being one of the standing elements today. In the modelling process it provides assistance in understanding the size of the original building.

Model update:
31st May 2019
Description:

A full photogrammetric survey was undertaken of the site. About 400 photos were taken by a drone circling the area, with a further set of pictures taken vertically. Specialist processing software turns these images into 3D models; the perspective view shown gives an explanatory view of the site and the vertical view supplies a base for the historic modelling. The camera on the drone records the location and height from which each image is taken and this enables the model to be placed with great precision.

Photogrammetry model

Model update:
31st May 2019
Description:

English Heritage undertook geophysical surveys of the site in November 2005 and March 2006. Overlaying their areas of magnetic anomaly provides further evidence of possible oareas of interest. Their full report can be accessed and downloaded as a PDF from the English Heritge site.

Geophysics data gathered by English Heritage

Model update:
31st May 2019
Description:

As ever the first stage of building a 3D model of the site is to gather all the available iinformation on what it might once have looked like. In this case, the albums of Daniel and Alfred Savin provide photographs from the second half of the 19th century. Daniel Savin was photographing in north Norfolk from about 1860; the albums are kept at Cromer Museum. The Priory began to deteriorate from the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII; in Victorian times, as today, much of the site was used for farming purposes and stone from the Priory has been used elsewhere in the locality..

Bromholme Priory 19th century

Model update:
31st May 2019
Description:

A plan of the Bromholme ruins was published by Henry Harrod FSA, in 1857 (Gleanings Among the Castles and Convents of Norfolk, p. 220) and was a combination of his own survey made in 1854 together with a plan made by Mr Spurdens in 1822 when the remains were more extensive.

Bromholme Priory Harrod's map 1854

Model update:
2017
Description:

The Paston Heritage Society have previously been able to arrange visits to the private site at Bromholme. Great care needs to be taken becasuse, as the photograph illustrates, some of the walls are in an unsafe state. Whilst the land is privately owned, the site is under the guardianship of English Heritage.

Ruins at Bromholme 2017